Review This Book
The world is quiet here
Home / Ask Me Anything / Books Reviewed / Currently Reading / Goodreads / Challenges / archive

Two Girls Staring At The Ceiling: Lucy Frank

image

Two Girls Staring At The Ceiling; Lucy Frank. 257 pages.

FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

This raw and gorgeous novel in verse will plunge you into the precarious world of illness, where summer love seems like a distant memory and the future is anything but certain.

I like how this book is formatted. It’s a bit wider than usual to make room for two columns of text, separated by a line that acts as the hospital room curtain. On the left side is the main narrator, Chess. On the right is Shannon, who only shows up when conversing with Chess or when other people are talking on her side of the room. There are instructions on how to read the story at the beginning of the book, but it’s not too complicated and it’s a cool concept. 

Chess doesn’t know what’s wrong with her. All she knows is that she’s been having stomach pain and has covered it up for a long time until she has a severe episode and is admitted to the hospital. Shannon has the same thing Chess does, but has suffered longer. I guessed what was wrong early ish on (it runs in my family), but readers don’t truly find out until about halfway through. This isn’t a huge spoiler (I hope - but stop reading until the next paragraph if you don’t want to know what her issue isn’t), but this book is so refreshing because it’s not about cancer. Sure these girls are sick, but there aren’t any/a lot of book who focus on this topic. I really like that.

It’s also a book wrought with emotion, because Chess is so angry, and Shannon is even angrier. It has notes of despair and melancholy because Chess has to come to terms with her diagnosis. She’s also embarrassed, which is very relatable. This book is a quick read, but that doesn’t mean it’s lacking. 

thefictionologist:

Next Saturday’s Stack! I’m excited to see what you’re planning to read :).

thefictionologist:

Next Saturday’s Stack! I’m excited to see what you’re planning to read :).

(via thebooker)

Source : thefictionologist
Book Stack Tag September 13 2014: Back to School
Top four: high school; bottom four: university

Book Stack Tag September 13 2014: Back to School

Top four: high school; bottom four: university

Since You’ve Been Gone: Morgan Matson

image

Since You’ve Been Gone; Morgan Matson. 449 pages.

FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

It was Sloane who yanked Emily out of her shell and made life 100% interesting. But right before what should have been the most epic summer, Sloane just…disappears. All she leaves behind is a to-do list.

On it, thirteen Sloane-inspired tasks that Emily would normally never try. But what if they could bring her best friend back?

Apple picking at night?
Okay, easy enough.

Dance until dawn?
Sure. Why not?

Kiss a stranger?
Um…

Emily now has this unexpected summer, and the help of Frank Porter (totally unexpected), to check things off Sloane’s list. Who knows what she’ll find?

Go skinny-dipping?
Wait…what?

This book started off pretty slow, I have to be honest. I am a fan of Matson, but the first half of this novel kind of dragged and I was waiting for some kind of action, or even some kind of event to happen. Once Emily wasn’t so isolated things got a bit more interesting and the pace picked up. I’m so glad it did, because I ended up liking this book.

Emily is extremely reserved and shy, but Sloane made up for that. When Sloane disappears, Emily has to forge conversations and new relationships by herself. She’s a bit awkward and finds it very hard to speak, and I’m ashamed to say it’s a little bit annoying because I’m exactly like her! I guess I’ll use that as motivation to change? I’m starting to realize it’s a fairly common thing, though, so it’s nice to see someone like me in a book. As she completes Sloane’s list and creates her own life without Sloane, she slowly emerges from her shell, so I guess there’s hope for me yet.

In that way I relate to Emily a lot. I find it very hard to talk to people, and especially to stop being so reserved. Maybe I need an adventure like Emily’s to remove some of my fear? In any case her story is kind of inspiring to me.

As for the book itself, I like it. I do not love it, but I really like Matson’s writing and characters. It’s maybe the plot and pacing that are holding me back a bit, but it’s still a good book. It becomes more about Emily becoming her own person and having her own adventures than it is about finding Sloane and completing the list, but I like that. At first I was so curious about where Sloane was, but the story progressed so organically to make it about Emily that I didn’t really care as much later on. There are also some of Matson’s trademark playlists, though they do appear kind of randomly. There is a lot to take away from this book, which I appreciate.

55 Question Book-Related Survey →

yearofthebibliophile:

Drop a number in my ask and I’ll answer any of these book-related questions! :D

1. Favorite childhood book?
2. What are you reading right now?
3. What books do you have on request at the library?
4. Bad book habit?
5. What do you currently have checked out at…

(via inbetweenfictionandreality)

Source : sarahthinksso.blogspot.com
Library haul

Library haul

thefictionologist:

readathousandlives:

Jasmine at thefictionologist and I have decided to create a weekly photo tag - the Book Stack Tag. It’s simple enough - take a photo of a book stack relating to a certain theme each Saturday.
For next Saturday, we decided that since a lot of people are heading back to school or to university over the next few weeks (or already have) that the theme would be “Back to School” - books that you have studied or are going to study at school or university.
To join us, just use the tag “book stack tag” and tag either or both us.

Don’t forget to be creative! x

thefictionologist:

readathousandlives:

Jasmine at thefictionologist and I have decided to create a weekly photo tag - the Book Stack Tag. It’s simple enough - take a photo of a book stack relating to a certain theme each Saturday.

For next Saturday, we decided that since a lot of people are heading back to school or to university over the next few weeks (or already have) that the theme would be “Back to School” - books that you have studied or are going to study at school or university.

To join us, just use the tag “book stack tag” and tag either or both us.

Don’t forget to be creative! x

Source : readathousandlives

Landline: Rainbow Rowell

image

Landline; Rainbow Rowell. 308 pages.

FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

Georgie McCool knows her marriage is in trouble. That it’s been in trouble for a long time. She still loves her husband, Neal, and Neal still loves her, deeply — but that almost seems beside the point now.

Maybe that was always beside the point.

Two days before they’re supposed to visit Neal’s family in Omaha for Christmas, Georgie tells Neal that she can’t go. She’s a TV writer, and something’s come up on her show; she has to stay in Los Angeles. She knows that Neal will be upset with her — Neal is always a little upset with Georgie — but she doesn’t expect to him to pack up the kids and go home without her.

When her husband and the kids leave for the airport, Georgie wonders if she’s finally done it. If she’s ruined everything.

That night, Georgie discovers a way to communicate with Neal in the past. It’s not time travel, not exactly, but she feels like she’s been given an opportunity to fix her marriage before it starts …

Is that what she’s supposed to do?

Or would Georgie and Neal be better off if their marriage never happened?

A lovely, lovely story from the great Rainbow Rowell. This is the third novel of hers I have read and it has solidified my place in her fandom. I love her writing and her characters, both in the way she builds them and the way they interact. When Neal’s personality is described he doesn’t sound all that great, but through Georgie’s eyes he becomes wonderful and worthy of pining over. Standing back it’s hard to even see how Neal and Georgie fit together, but the writing and emotion make you root for them either way. Even in third person perspective so much of Georgie’s personality comes out that it reads like first person. This story is just another example of how she combines all of these elements beautifully into a cute, entertaining, and heartfelt story. 

#swag(bag)

#swag(bag)

Inland: Kat Rosenfield

image

Inland; Kat Rosenfield. 382 pages.

FROM THE BOOK JACKET:

After nine years spent suffering in the arid expanses of the Midwest, far from the sea where her mother drowned, Callie Morgan and her father are returning to the coast. And miraculously, Callie can finally breathe easily. No more sudden, clawing attacks and weeklong hospital stays.

But something is calling to her from the river behind their house and from the ocean miles away. Just as her life begins to feel like her own, and the potential for romance is blossoming, the intoxicating pull of the dark water seeps into her mind, filling her with doubt and revealing family secrets. Is it madness, or is there a voice, beckoning her to come to the sea? To answer the call of the dark waves. To come home.

(Beautiful cover alert!)

This is a dark book. The whole narrative, coming from Callie’s point of view, is shadowed with melancholy and mystery and a bit of fantasy. Kind of? That’s one of the problems I ran into with this book. It teeters between reality and fantasy, which could be intriguing, but the fact that it never picks a side bothers me. I can understand leaving it up to the reader to decide, because that can be a great concept, it just doesn’t really work in this case. I’m not a huge fan of this book because of the darkness and confusing mystery, but I think that’s just a personal preference thing. The mood and atmosphere of the novel is the exact same throughout the whole thing, which didn’t make for a very interesting reading experience for me. It was hard to get through and I got bored a lot. It’s an interesting concept, though, so those who like fantasy might like it a bit more than I do.